I did a little talk about leaving gaps in things at the Next Conference in Berlin a few months ago. You can watch me fidget, stumble and accidentally say ‘shit’ instead of ‘shift’ here: http://nextberlin.eu/2012/12/gaps/ 

I did a little talk about leaving gaps in things at the Next Conference in Berlin a few months ago. You can watch me fidget, stumble and accidentally say ‘shit’ instead of ‘shift’ here: http://nextberlin.eu/2012/12/gaps/ 

I left London. I live in Berlin now. Beside my bed is a copy of Bowie in Berlin: A New Career In A New Town. I am seeking out the next step.

I left London. I live in Berlin now. Beside my bed is a copy of Bowie in Berlin: A New Career In A New Town. I am seeking out the next step.

A while back I watched Mark Cousins’ excellent (if slightly grating) series “The Story of Film: An Odessey”. It was full of amazing insights and anecdotes but I was particularly fascinated by the description of Carl Theodor Dreyer’s set decoration technique.
Dreyer was obsessed with simplicity, with reducing and reducing, with achieving a whiteness or a plainness that would provide more focus. He had vision and focus, he wanted his films to purge silent cinema of it’s spectacle and decoration.
Dreyer explained how, when filming Ordet, he “began a radical simplification. I would only accept things directly related to the story…There was a large kitchen that I wished to simplify, and I succeeded. You can’t simplify reality without understanding it first, so I asked the woman who ran the studio canteen to equip the kitchen as if it were her own, the way she would feel at ease in it. She brought all kinds of kitchen stuff - plates and pots and pans - which she arranged as she wished. When she’d finished, the cameraman Bendtsen and I began taking objects away one by one, until only four or five were left. In this simplified form, the notion of a kitchen was much clearer than before.”
I like the idea of reducing to provide clarity, only alluding to the idea of a kitchen. Just enough for you to understand but not too much for you to be distracted. It’s like sculpture. Start chipping away and eventually the form will reveal itself.

A while back I watched Mark Cousins’ excellent (if slightly grating) series “The Story of Film: An Odessey”. It was full of amazing insights and anecdotes but I was particularly fascinated by the description of Carl Theodor Dreyer’s set decoration technique.

Dreyer was obsessed with simplicity, with reducing and reducing, with achieving a whiteness or a plainness that would provide more focus. He had vision and focus, he wanted his films to purge silent cinema of it’s spectacle and decoration.

Dreyer explained how, when filming Ordet, he “began a radical simplification. I would only accept things directly related to the story…There was a large kitchen that I wished to simplify, and I succeeded. You can’t simplify reality without understanding it first, so I asked the woman who ran the studio canteen to equip the kitchen as if it were her own, the way she would feel at ease in it. She brought all kinds of kitchen stuff - plates and pots and pans - which she arranged as she wished. When she’d finished, the cameraman Bendtsen and I began taking objects away one by one, until only four or five were left. In this simplified form, the notion of a kitchen was much clearer than before.”

I like the idea of reducing to provide clarity, only alluding to the idea of a kitchen. Just enough for you to understand but not too much for you to be distracted. It’s like sculpture. Start chipping away and eventually the form will reveal itself.

Intentions

The obligatory intro blog post. Set out your stall. It will either continue or it will be added to that sad yet profound collection of single post blogs, full of best intentions and empty promises. Hopefully not the latter.

I like how disposable tumblr feels. Post and then move on. It will be used as a place to deposit questions about the things I find interesting. There are too many in my head right now to make sense of and I’d like to lay them all out and see if any themes emerge. A digital tool that could points you in the right direction - I guess that’s one of my themes at the moment, so it looks like I’m off to a good start.

Pale Sun is Conor Delahunty’s blog. He is a designer who focuses on web products & services. Right now he is in Berlin looking for the next step. Previously he worked in London with the amazing folk at Made by Many.

Elsewhere:
Twitter / Instagram / Reading.am / Svpply / Readmill